Why a Trump Presidency Really Might Make America Great Again

By Jono Davis Columnist, International Relations Student  Can’t believe I’m saying this, but: I’m excited for a Trump Presidency (if only for the promising future in the realms of defense and foreign policy). The United States of America has lost its way a bit on the foreign policy stage, both blundering into Iraq and Afghanistan…

Labour: A Party Divided

  By Ruaraidh Maciver Editor-in-Chief, History Student Political polls haven’t had the best of reputations recently. In the 2015 British general election, no major poll showed a Conservative majority government, with both YouGov and Lord Ashcroft predicting a far closer race, with both primary parties being tied going into the final days. The polls on…

Isolation Trade in a Trumpian America

By James Moynan Editor, Undergraduate Economics Student As the world adjusts to the news that the US electorate has voted for a man who seems more concerned about the public perception of the size of his hands than human rights violations, discussion turns to what exactly caused an outcome that seemed unlikely a week ago to…

Yemen: A Civil War Forgotten

By Ruaraidh Maciver Editor-in-Chief, History Student  Throughout the last two years, the majority of journalistic pieces emerging from the Middle East have been primarily addressing the continuing conflict in Syria. The seemingly endless and desperate situation facing the country becoming ever more complicated as the world watches on without answer. You could be forgiven then,…

Baden-Württemberg: a Model for Green Politics

By Michael McCabe  Undergraduate Economics & International Relations Student The German state of Baden-Württemberg is an economic powerhouse. Its unemployment rate is more than 2 points below the national average. Its exports contribute disproportionately to Germany’s national trade surplus, which is the second largest in the world. It is home to the headquarters and primary…

Barriers to Progress on Climate Change Agreements Still Ahead

By Siobhan Kelly Editor, Undergraduate Economics Student There is now little doubt that climate change is occurring, and that human activity is the primary cause. Empirical evidence for the greenhouse effect has mounted, whereby the build up of Carbon Dioxide and other Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is leading to global warming and other important climate…

Labour’s £205 Billion Nuclear Problem

By: Felix Langley Classics Undergraduate Student On the 26th of September the Shadow Defence Secretary, Clive Lewis, announced that Labour would henceforth follow a policy of multilateral disarmament and that he would not use his position to try to turn Labour to unilateralism1. Two days later Jeremy Corbyn expressed his disagreement with Labour’s previous decision to back…

Green versus Gr€€n: The Energy Politics of Germany

By Kyra Ward Economics & International Relations Student  In June of this year, Germany made the unprecedented move to scale back on its world-class green energy sector. One of its radical renewable energy programs Energiewende (literally translating to energy revolution/transition) is taking substantive budget reductions and restructuring.  As a country on the forefront of the…

Unfinished Ambition: The Obama Legacy at Home

By Jono Davis  Undergraduate International Relations Student Barack Obama: the 44th President of the United States, the fifteenth Democratic president and most markedly the first African-American president, but also a name that can create emotions of both elatedness and utter disgust. Whilst all presidents create and command their own unique versions of America, Obama’s tenure…

South Sudan: War & Tragedy in the World’s Newest State

By Erika Brady Columnist, PhD Student at the Handa Center of Terrorism and Political Violence Introduction The conflict in South Sudan, the world’s newest country, has played an integral and unfortunate part in the shaping of that nation. Since its formation following relatively peaceful elections in January 2011, the country has been torn apart by civil war…

“But We Have No Slaves in the UK”

By Giovy Drysdale-Anderson Economics & English Student  As it was Anti-Slavery Day earlier this week, this is an ideal time to reflect on the issue of Modern Day slavery and assess the role the UK ought to play in fighting this global issue.  One of the earliest recorded cases of slavery in Scotland is the 1687…

The Beginning of the End for the US-Saudi Relationship?

By Kyra Ward Economics & International Relations Student For the first time in his presidency Obama saw his veto of a bill overridden. With a 97-1 majority in the House (House democratic minority leader Harry Reid being the only exception) and 348-77 majority in the Senate the bill had overwhelming bi-partisan support. With a Congress increasingly embittered and unwilling…