Learning from Brussels

By Erika Brady Columnist, PhD Student at the Handa Center of Terrorism and Political Violence Yet again, the ugly face of terrorism has struck at one of Europe’s capitals, and yet again, we are looking for someone to blame. Following the attacks in Paris on 13 November 2015, fingers were pointed at refugees as being, if not…

For the Refugees: “England good, Norway good, Canada good, America good”

By Tom Mcelholm Correspondent, History Undergraduate Student  I stood monitoring the line for clothes distribution in Calais’ Refugee Camp during the emergency week in mid-January. The CRS had announced the impending demolition of a portion of the Kurdish section of the camp. Days after journalists left they would enter the camp in APCs, teargas it…

Shaping Safety: How Architects Can Build a Stronger Peace

By Kate Cyr Correspondent, Master Student in Peace & Conflict Studies I take my home for granted. There, I said it. Chances are you do, too, if your conception of home – like mine – does not include worrying about the daily dangers of a civil war playing out on your doorstep; the mortar shelling that has…

Back in the USSR

By Thomas Claridge Columnist, International Relations Graduate Student As the wintry nights draw in and the festive season tiptoes closer, spare a thought for Sergei Karakayev. As Commander of Russia’s Strategic Missile Troops, he must be quaking in his boots over the all-important question consuming the Kremlin this time of year; what present does one…

European Students: How Valuable Will Your Money Be?

By Blanca Franch Camino Correspondent, Undergraduate Economics Student  European Union students at the University of St Andrews have probably been wondering about the most intelligent way to behave regarding recent changes of their finances. Little did they know that many of the most important decisions were being made for them. In fact, during second semester last…

Syria: The Global Conflict

By Ruaraidh Maciver Middle East/Africa Editor, History Undergraduate Student The Islamic State has existed as an independent group for almost two years now, and is currently fighting several different factions within Syria and Iraq. These include the Iraqi army and its’ associated militias, the Kurdish nationalists YPG, the Syrian rebels, the Syrian army, and is…

We are Better than Blaming Refugees

A solution to this crisis will not be easy and results will not be obvious but blaming refugees from the Middle East will gain us nothing.

EU Parliamentary Elections: The Fiscal Standoff

Originally published in Issue IV of the St Andrews Economist  By: Grzegorz Janota and Maxime Segui Do we as individual voters really have a say in the fiscal policies of the European Union? Thanks to the Lisbon Treaty, which was adopted in 2009 and came to force in 2011, the answer to that question is…

The High Cost of Winning

Originally published in Issue IV of the St Andrews Economist By: James McNamara Playing host to the world’s legends has always been the pinnacle of sporting pride for any nation. But aside from all the grandeur, how do these major events really impact a region’s economy? The short answer: it is virtually impossible to accurately…

Monetary Policies of the ECB and the Bank of England

By: Renzo Forastiero “The primary objective of the ECB’s monetary policy is to maintain price stability. The ECB aims at inflation rates of below, but close to, 2% over the medium term.” The above sentence highlights the main flaw of the mandate given to the European Central Bank (ECB) at the Euro’s inception, inflexibility.   It’s…

IMF Strengthens Argument for Higher Inflation in Eurozone

By: Grzegorz Janota The International Monetary Fund’s newly released paper by Reinhart and Rogoff evaluates measures used by the European Central Bank (ECB) to combat debt. The authors point out that, with current debt levels, growth in the Eurozone would be stunted by 1.2% over the next 23 years. In addition to austerity measures, the…