Turkey: Our Might Makes Right

By Ruaraidh Maciver Middle East/Africa Editor, History Undergraduate Student Throughout history, we have seen attempts by every country across the globe to justify military action. In 2003, we heard President George W. Bush justify Operation Iraqi Freedom, as the existence of a ‘regime that threatens peace with weapons of mass murder’ was unacceptable to ‘the United…

Botswana: How to Dig an Economy Out of a Hole

By Ruaraidh Maciver Middle East/Africa Editor, History Undergraduate Student In the aftermath of the 2008 recession, Botswana’s economy suffered perhaps more than any other African nation, with its industrial sector alone shrinking by a staggering 30%. However, a long time has passed since this critical moment in Botswana’s past, and the economic doldrums of almost a…

For the Refugees: “England good, Norway good, Canada good, America good”

By Tom Mcelholm Correspondent, History Undergraduate Student  I stood monitoring the line for clothes distribution in Calais’ Refugee Camp during the emergency week in mid-January. The CRS had announced the impending demolition of a portion of the Kurdish section of the camp. Days after journalists left they would enter the camp in APCs, teargas it…

The Syrian Conflict: Religion Conflict & Terrorism

By Erika Brady Columnist, PhD Student at the Handa Center of Terrorism and Political Violence It is difficult to know where to look in assessing the biggest threat to stability in the Middle East these days. Certainly, Syria has become the primary focus, and the tragedy unfolding there is rarely far from our minds.  But as has…

Read All About It (Or Not): The Trouble with the Turkish Press

By Kate Cyr Correspondent, Masters Student in Peace & Conflict Studies Istanbul’s 2013 Gezi Park protests unearthed muddy tales of corruption, bias, and authoritarianism that powerful conglomerates and the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) would have preferred buried indefinitely. The government received global scrutiny as anyone from students to grandmothers gathered in the streets…

Shaping Safety: How Architects Can Build a Stronger Peace

By Kate Cyr Correspondent, Master Student in Peace & Conflict Studies I take my home for granted. There, I said it. Chances are you do, too, if your conception of home – like mine – does not include worrying about the daily dangers of a civil war playing out on your doorstep; the mortar shelling that has…

What Happened to the Egyptian Revolution?

By Erika Brady Columnist, PhD Student at the Handa Center of Terrorism and Political Violence Almost five years on from the outbreak of the Egyptian Revolution, it is an interesting time to ask what has changed in the country? The casual observer might think not a lot. If you were to look at Egypt in 2010, and…

Syria: The Global Conflict

By Ruaraidh Maciver Middle East/Africa Editor, History Undergraduate Student The Islamic State has existed as an independent group for almost two years now, and is currently fighting several different factions within Syria and Iraq. These include the Iraqi army and its’ associated militias, the Kurdish nationalists YPG, the Syrian rebels, the Syrian army, and is…

Africa’s Most Prominet Couple: South Africa and Nigeria

By: Maxime Seguin The fact that Nigeria is not part of BRICS (but South Africa is) should not, by any means, diminish its importance within the developing world. Interestingly, but perhaps unsurprisingly, Nigeria is expected to outperform South Africa in the year 2014 to become Africa’s most thriving economy. This has spurred Jacob Zuma, South…

Is OPEC Fracked?

By: Craig McNeill Founded in 1960, the OPEC cartel quickly developed into a strong force on global oil markets having the ability to influence prices for the benefit of its 12 member states.  Most famously in the early 1970s, they choked the US oil market with an embargo which led to a fourfold increase of…