“Grappling” with Feminist IR: A Conversation with Cynthia Enloe

It takes a lot more curiosity, combined with a lot more nuanced attentiveness and intellectual stamina to reveal political realities in ways that are truly reliable.

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Dabbling in Disaster: Stability through Catastrophe Bonds?

By Matthew Findlay Correspondent, Mathematics Undergraduate After a record hurricane season, investors in catastrophe bonds are counting up their losses.  Catastrophe bonds, also known as Cat bonds, are debt instruments that pay attractive interest rates, typically issued by reinsurers to cover their liabilities in the event of huge damages that may be caused by larger but…

Boycott Economics and the Animal Agriculture Industry

By Vidur Kapur Correspondent, Medical Undergraduate  “Britain is a nation of animal lovers.” On first glance, this statement has an element of truth to it: after all, we were the first country in the world to pass animal welfare legislation, and some 40% of UK households own a pet. These pets make up a sizeable chunk…

Information Sharing, Security and Cost Post-Brexit

By Kyra Ward,  Editor, Economics Student March 29th, 2017 will go down in history as the day the United Kingdom (UK) officially left the European Union (EU), and the European experiment. While it will take two years to finalize negotiations, March 29th will mark the day that Brexit (Britain’s Exit) became official. No matter how Brexit…

Blockchain: A Tech Improvement or Revolution?

By Giovy Drysdale-Anderson Editor, Economics & English Student  When Bitcoin first launched, few had heard about the world’s first digital currency functioning on a peer-to-peer system. But since its launch by Satoshi Nakamoto on October of 2008, it has played a major role in propelling us into the age of Fintechs. The various changes to traditional industries…

The Market This Week: Feb 20

By Tom Weston Economics Student Global stock market indices reached new highs this week. The recent rally is largely a consequence of the election of President Trump, with his economic policies – tax cuts, infrastructure spending and financial deregulation – expected to improve economic growth prospects for the US. The FTSE All-World share index broke…

Why we Should be Learning the Radical History of Economics

By Adam Strømme Editor-in-Chief, Economic & International Relations Student  As a student of the history of economic thought, i’m almost more comfortable discussing the various points of conflict between various economic theories than the theories themselves. Economics, like no other discipline, has been defined by debate and controversy. And the debates which have raged are far from topical, they…

The Market this Week: 25 September

By Stephan Maier Editor, Economics Student Continuing from last week, the FED continues to dominate market sentiment with chair Janet Yellen speaking to the House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday. US equities, despite sliding on Friday, rose by 1.2% over the past week, welcoming the increased certainty of one rather sure rate hike this year in December, should…

The Market this Week: 18 September

By Stephan Maier Editor, Economics Student The dominating announcement for an otherwise quiet coming week will be the FED’s Federal Open Market Committee deciding on interest rates and publishing their decision at 7 pm our time on Wednesday. With a lot of talk about a rate hike in 2016 and no action taken so far,…

Economics: a Social Science?

By: Adam Strømme Editor-in-Chief, Economics & International Relations Student  After the crash of 2008, many were understandably mad. Mad at the greed of speculative financiers; mad at the ineptitude and willful ignorance of regulators; mad at the lack of punishment of those responsible; and mad at the perpetual austerity the bailouts had now offloaded onto…

Cannibalistic Corporations: the Emerging Danger of Debt

By Dillon Yeh Correspondent, Economics Undergraduate Student Imagine a lizard without means of nourish in a vast desert. In order to survive the lizard begins eating its own tail, with the ability to regenerate the part again. However, with each consumption, the tail returns ever diminishing in size. The lizard is forced to mutilate itself…

The Whale on Stage: The Risk of Sovereign Wealth Funds

By Dillon Yeh Correspondent, Economics Undergraduate Student  There is your money, which usually sits in a checking or savings account in a bank. But if you have enough money, then you can put some of it into stocks. Enter stage left, your retail investors. But if you have even more money, then you can pay…