Information Sharing, Security and Cost Post-Brexit

By Kyra Ward,  Editor, Economics Student March 29th, 2017 will go down in history as the day the United Kingdom (UK) officially left the European Union (EU), and the European experiment. While it will take two years to finalize negotiations, March 29th will mark the day that Brexit (Britain’s Exit) became official. No matter how Brexit…

The Basics of Universal Income: Beyond the Divide

By Matthew Findlay  Correspondent, Mathematics Undergraduate Student  The idea of a universal basic income (UBI) recently entered the mainstream discussion in several countries.  Finland is currently trialling the policy, and it is being lauded and criticized by commentators from across the political spectrum. So what is UBI, anyway? According to the basic income website, a UBI…

Blockchain: A Tech Improvement or Revolution?

By Giovy Drysdale-Anderson Editor, Economics & English Student  When Bitcoin first launched, few had heard about the world’s first digital currency functioning on a peer-to-peer system. But since its launch by Satoshi Nakamoto on October of 2008, it has played a major role in propelling us into the age of Fintechs. The various changes to traditional industries…

Chinese Aid and Investment: Aiding Africa or Themselves?

By Hodhan Jibril International Relations & Arabic Student In 2006, China invited 48 African heads of state to Beijing and with them, a fierce debate on the nature of foreign investment in Africa. According to Dambisa Moyo, a Zambian-born international economist, Africa needs foreign investment to supplement its growth. Despite the continent’s resources and low labour…

The London Terror Attack: Perspective, Honesty & Hope

By Erika Brady Columnist, PhD Student at the Handa Center of Terrorism and Political Violence The attack in London on 22 March 2017 has, unsurprisingly, been dominant in the British media for the past week. At the outset, the viewer and reader was bombarded with flashy headlines and minute by minute analysis, even when there was no…

Northern Ireland’s parties negotiate a return to power-sharing

By Conor Tully Correspondent, Undergraduate IR & Russian Student On Thursday 2nd March, Northern Ireland went to the polls for the second time in less than a year. The Executive, having withstood considerable pressure in recent years over unresolved issues from the Troubles, had collapsed. A botched energy scheme set up by the first minister —the Democratic…

Brexit. Trump. France?

By Matthew Findlay Mathematics Student In three months’ time, France holds its next presidential elections.  The country is still on edge – it has been in a state of emergency since the Paris attacks in November 2015.  Voters will have the choice between several candidates on the 23rd of April, before the two highest scoring amongst them go…

The Market This Week: Feb 20

By Tom Weston Economics Student Global stock market indices reached new highs this week. The recent rally is largely a consequence of the election of President Trump, with his economic policies – tax cuts, infrastructure spending and financial deregulation – expected to improve economic growth prospects for the US. The FTSE All-World share index broke…

Partisanship: Is it Beyond Repair?

By Jono Davis Editor, International Relations Student  Once upon a time, partisanship was a word used only in the United States to describe sports teams: if it was baseball it was the Braves-Mets rivalry, or if it was basketball it was Celtics-Lakers. Politics however, was an entirely different story: President Gerald Ford, in his confirmation…

Wally Obermeyer on Student Saving and Money Management

Kyra Ward, St Andrews Economist columnist, spoke with Walter R. Obermeyer, the President of ObermeyerWood, one of the largest private investment advisory firms in Colorado. They sat down to discuss his insights into savings as it relates to university students as a economic and financial expert. He is consistently listed as one of the leading investing advisors in…

Why a Trump Presidency Really Might Make America Great Again

By Jono Davis Columnist, International Relations Student  Can’t believe I’m saying this, but: I’m excited for a Trump Presidency (if only for the promising future in the realms of defense and foreign policy). The United States of America has lost its way a bit on the foreign policy stage, both blundering into Iraq and Afghanistan…

Labour: A Party Divided

  By Ruaraidh Maciver Editor-in-Chief, History Student Political polls haven’t had the best of reputations recently. In the 2015 British general election, no major poll showed a Conservative majority government, with both YouGov and Lord Ashcroft predicting a far closer race, with both primary parties being tied going into the final days. The polls on…