“The Invisible Heart: An Economic Romance”

By Kyra Ward Economics & International Relations Student  Economics is known as the dismal science. A social science that is poor at predicting future trends, and notoriously tied with greed and consumerism. Economics isn’t the most popular of subjects. Even most economics majors will tell you that one of the only reasons they study economics…

Despite Political Challenges, Florida Rediscovers its Railway Heritage

By Alex Hayes International Relations Student  Florida is finally getting an intercity passenger rail system that will link the popular tourist destinations of Orlando and Miami. After more than 16 years of political blockage by Republican governors, it took significant private investment to put the project into place. Once built Brightline will offer numerous benefits…

Why Trump Probably Won’t Make America Great Again

By Jono Davis Columnist, International Relations Student  A few weeks ago, I stipulated that I was fairly positive about a Trump administration in the foreign policy field. Needless to say, despite Stephen Colbert’s brilliant analysis (sarcasm) that someone with the nickname “Mad Dog” shouldn’t be Secretary of Defense, I stand by the opinion that there…

Baden-Württemberg: a Model for Green Politics

By Michael McCabe  Undergraduate Economics & International Relations Student The German state of Baden-Württemberg is an economic powerhouse. Its unemployment rate is more than 2 points below the national average. Its exports contribute disproportionately to Germany’s national trade surplus, which is the second largest in the world. It is home to the headquarters and primary…

Labour’s £205 Billion Nuclear Problem

By: Felix Langley Classics Undergraduate Student On the 26th of September the Shadow Defence Secretary, Clive Lewis, announced that Labour would henceforth follow a policy of multilateral disarmament and that he would not use his position to try to turn Labour to unilateralism1. Two days later Jeremy Corbyn expressed his disagreement with Labour’s previous decision to back…

Unfinished Ambition: The Obama Legacy at Home

By Jono Davis  Undergraduate International Relations Student Barack Obama: the 44th President of the United States, the fifteenth Democratic president and most markedly the first African-American president, but also a name that can create emotions of both elatedness and utter disgust. Whilst all presidents create and command their own unique versions of America, Obama’s tenure…

The Market this Week: 18 September

By Stephan Maier Editor, Economics Student The dominating announcement for an otherwise quiet coming week will be the FED’s Federal Open Market Committee deciding on interest rates and publishing their decision at 7 pm our time on Wednesday. With a lot of talk about a rate hike in 2016 and no action taken so far,…

A Single Act: Repercussions, from Orlando to the Ordinary

By Tom Mcelholm Correspondent, History Undergraduate Student  Google shows us what the world thinks. It shows us that we see Orlando as a segway into debate about debate about: gun control, Islam and psychology. Facebook shows us what our friends feel. My friends feel a sense of loss and grievance. Debate about gun control is…

We Lost, Alright?: Reflections of a Post-Primary Bern

By Jono Davis  Undergraduate International Relations Student A few months ago, I wrote an article for this very website, in which positivity radiated from the page, describing the incredible experience of contributing to the Bernie Sanders campaign in the largest way I possibly could being a UK citizen. Now, as I sit down to begin…

Pulling Strings: Making the Toupee Say What You Want it to Say

By: Adam Stromme Editor-in-Chief, Economics and International Relations Undergraduate Student  Immediately after passing the threshold of 1,237 delegates in order to clinch the Republican nomination on Thursday, Donald Trump gave a speech at the Williston Basin Petroleum Conference in Bismarck, North Dakota; a state at the very epicenter of the shale natural gas boom. Without…

Cannibalistic Corporations: the Emerging Danger of Debt

By Dillon Yeh Correspondent, Economics Undergraduate Student Imagine a lizard without means of nourish in a vast desert. In order to survive the lizard begins eating its own tail, with the ability to regenerate the part again. However, with each consumption, the tail returns ever diminishing in size. The lizard is forced to mutilate itself…