Partisanship: Is it Beyond Repair?

By Jono Davis Editor, International Relations Student  Once upon a time, partisanship was a word used only in the United States to describe sports teams: if it was baseball it was the Braves-Mets rivalry, or if it was basketball it was Celtics-Lakers. Politics however, was an entirely different story: President Gerald Ford, in his confirmation…

Wally Obermeyer on Student Saving and Money Management

Kyra Ward, St Andrews Economist columnist, spoke with Walter R. Obermeyer, the President of ObermeyerWood, one of the largest private investment advisory firms in Colorado. They sat down to discuss his insights into savings as it relates to university students as a economic and financial expert. He is consistently listed as one of the leading investing advisors in…

“The Invisible Heart: An Economic Romance”

By Kyra Ward Economics & International Relations Student  Economics is known as the dismal science. A social science that is poor at predicting future trends, and notoriously tied with greed and consumerism. Economics isn’t the most popular of subjects. Even most economics majors will tell you that one of the only reasons they study economics…

Despite Political Challenges, Florida Rediscovers its Railway Heritage

By Alex Hayes International Relations Student  Florida is finally getting an intercity passenger rail system that will link the popular tourist destinations of Orlando and Miami. After more than 16 years of political blockage by Republican governors, it took significant private investment to put the project into place. Once built Brightline will offer numerous benefits…

Why Trump Probably Won’t Make America Great Again

By Jono Davis Columnist, International Relations Student  A few weeks ago, I stipulated that I was fairly positive about a Trump administration in the foreign policy field. Needless to say, despite Stephen Colbert’s brilliant analysis (sarcasm) that someone with the nickname “Mad Dog” shouldn’t be Secretary of Defense, I stand by the opinion that there…

Why a Trump Presidency Really Might Make America Great Again

By Jono Davis Columnist, International Relations Student  Can’t believe I’m saying this, but: I’m excited for a Trump Presidency (if only for the promising future in the realms of defense and foreign policy). The United States of America has lost its way a bit on the foreign policy stage, both blundering into Iraq and Afghanistan…

Labour: A Party Divided

  By Ruaraidh Maciver Editor-in-Chief, History Student Political polls haven’t had the best of reputations recently. In the 2015 British general election, no major poll showed a Conservative majority government, with both YouGov and Lord Ashcroft predicting a far closer race, with both primary parties being tied going into the final days. The polls on…

Isolation Trade in a Trumpian America

By James Moynan Editor, Undergraduate Economics Student As the world adjusts to the news that the US electorate has voted for a man who seems more concerned about the public perception of the size of his hands than human rights violations, discussion turns to what exactly caused an outcome that seemed unlikely a week ago to…

Yemen: A Civil War Forgotten

By Ruaraidh Maciver Editor-in-Chief, History Student  Throughout the last two years, the majority of journalistic pieces emerging from the Middle East have been primarily addressing the continuing conflict in Syria. The seemingly endless and desperate situation facing the country becoming ever more complicated as the world watches on without answer. You could be forgiven then,…

Baden-Württemberg: a Model for Green Politics

By Michael McCabe  Undergraduate Economics & International Relations Student The German state of Baden-Württemberg is an economic powerhouse. Its unemployment rate is more than 2 points below the national average. Its exports contribute disproportionately to Germany’s national trade surplus, which is the second largest in the world. It is home to the headquarters and primary…

Barriers to Progress on Climate Change Agreements Still Ahead

By Siobhan Kelly Editor, Undergraduate Economics Student There is now little doubt that climate change is occurring, and that human activity is the primary cause. Empirical evidence for the greenhouse effect has mounted, whereby the build up of Carbon Dioxide and other Greenhouse gases in the atmosphere is leading to global warming and other important climate…

Labour’s £205 Billion Nuclear Problem

By: Felix Langley Classics Undergraduate Student On the 26th of September the Shadow Defence Secretary, Clive Lewis, announced that Labour would henceforth follow a policy of multilateral disarmament and that he would not use his position to try to turn Labour to unilateralism1. Two days later Jeremy Corbyn expressed his disagreement with Labour’s previous decision to back…