Event Review: Make a Million Before 30

By Joanna Kalemba Economics Undergraduate Student “Who would have come to this event if the ticket was 10 pounds?” The great majority of the audience, all planning to “Make a Million Before 30,” as the event was aptly named, raised their hands at the talk on Thursday night. “Who would have come if it was 20…

Five Steps to Improve Your Career Prospects this Week

By Joanna Kalemba President of the Economics Society  “I never learned a thing from a tournament I won.” – Bobby Jones 1) Winning Women Conference (The Lumsden Club) When: Monday, 29th of February, 5.30pm Where: Parliament Hall, South Street Why: To get inspired and gain insight into career opportunities by networking with six leading businesswomen from advertising,…

Larry Sanders: Thoughts on His Brother & Britain

Ruaraidh Maciver talks with Larry Sanders, British politician and brother of aspiring Democratic Presidential nominee, US Sen. Bernie Sanders. Most people are by now aware of the meteoric rise of Bernie Sanders’ campaign for the Democratic Primary. Outwith his own state, many were unaware of the Brooklyn born politician in America, and even less knew of his career in…

Students for Life: a Controversial Society

Dominic Nolan talks with Jack Stukel, the President of the Students for Life – St Andrews, about running a controversial society in a university environment. What does your society do? Students for Life St Andrews is all about promoting a culture of life in St Andrews University and to celebrate life from conception till natural…

For the Refugees: “England good, Norway good, Canada good, America good”

By Tom Mcelholm Correspondent, History Undergraduate Student  I stood monitoring the line for clothes distribution in Calais’ Refugee Camp during the emergency week in mid-January. The CRS had announced the impending demolition of a portion of the Kurdish section of the camp. Days after journalists left they would enter the camp in APCs, teargas it…

Economics Book Club: Migration, its Economic and Social Effects

By Diksha Babbar EPRG Outreach, The Economics Society This semester Dr. Ian Smith from the School of Economics and Finance has organised a weekly Economics book club. The main aim of the event is to encourage discussion on current economic issues amongst students passionate about economics. The book club is not restricted to Economics students, but is…

Risky Investments: The Politics of 2016

By Adam Stromme Editor-in-Chief, International Relations & Economics Undergraduate Student Mark Hanna, the legendary Gilded Age political manager was fond of saying: “It takes three things to run a political campaign in America: Money, money, and I forgot the third thing…” Following the money, and the dash of cynicism which is always a safe bet…

Influencing an Election in Which I Can’t Vote

By Jono Davis  Undergraduate International Relations Student Before attempting to describe the intriguing and often puzzling process of campaigning during American elections from the perspective of a Brit, I must first wholeheartedly thank three incredible people, whom, without their help, the Bernie Sanders campaign in St Andrews would genuinely have been nothing but a pipe…

And There Were Eight: Life After Scalia

By William Goodall Correspondent, International Relations Undergraduate Student On 13 February, United States Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, was found dead at age 79. The longest serving justice on the Supreme Court, Scalia was appointed by former President Ronald Reagan and served for 29 years. While often criticized by liberals for his hard-line conservative stance and almost…

The Syrian Conflict: Religion Conflict & Terrorism

By Erika Brady Columnist, PhD Student at the Handa Center of Terrorism and Political Violence It is difficult to know where to look in assessing the biggest threat to stability in the Middle East these days. Certainly, Syria has become the primary focus, and the tragedy unfolding there is rarely far from our minds.  But as has…

Excellent Essays: The Industrial Revolution as a Result of Britain’s Commercial Success Between 1500-1750

By Sergey Puchkov Economics Undergraduate Student Trade as the Cause of the Industrial Revolution in Britain As Robert C. Allen put it, “Britain’s empire served Britain’s economy.” Between 1500-1750, Britain established a colonial trade empire, and overtook Mediterranean economies in the production and export of wool and draperies. The development of commerce led to: (1) the growth of…

Alec Ross: A Lecture on the Age of Innovation

By Jolie Tran Undergraduate Student Lecture by Alec Ross: November, 2015 “He who has access to data and information will have control to the political and economic worlds of the technological age.” Alec Ross, Hillary Clinton’s former Senior Advisor for Innovation, came to the University  in November to share his story and his vision for …