Dabbling in Disaster: Stability through Catastrophe Bonds?

By Matthew Findlay Correspondent, Mathematics Undergraduate After a record hurricane season, investors in catastrophe bonds are counting up their losses.  Catastrophe bonds, also known as Cat bonds, are debt instruments that pay attractive interest rates, typically issued by reinsurers to cover their liabilities in the event of huge damages that may be caused by larger but…

In the Shadow of Apartheid: Race, Radicalism, and Division in South Africa

By Sam Maybee Correspondent, International Relations and Modern History Undergraduate Standing atop Table Mountain, you can be forgiven for thinking South Africa has truly emerged into an era of calm after a century of turbulence. The skyscrapers of Cape Town stand gracefully over the azure waters of the Atlantic, the tangle of motorways teeming with ant-like…

The Economics of Desertification

By Kyra Ward Economics & International Relations Student  The Kubuqi desert has never attracted much attention internationally. Even in China it is dwarfed in significance of the Gobi.  Located in the northern region of China, the Kubuqi desert stands on the banks of the Yellow River. Historically, the Kubuqi has been overexploited by its host…

Boycott Economics and the Animal Agriculture Industry

By Vidur Kapur Correspondent, Medical Undergraduate  “Britain is a nation of animal lovers.” On first glance, this statement has an element of truth to it: after all, we were the first country in the world to pass animal welfare legislation, and some 40% of UK households own a pet. These pets make up a sizeable chunk…