Should we stay or should we go?

By Tom Claridge International Relations Graduate Student, Columnist  Essentially, both sides of the EU debate are right. The Leave campaign is correct when they talk of the Union’s impact upon Parliament’s sovereignty, as the EU does have the ability to make rules for its twenty-seven member states. Each European law is essentially one part British…

Brexit in the Bubble

By Blanca Franch Camino Undergraduate Economics Student, Correspondent  Politics, despite popular misconceptions, affects our lives in several ways. A Brexit would have serious repercussions in St Andrews, since both the financial structure and the entire higher education system are tied up in the European Union. St Andrews would see marked effects on both its funding…

Une Revolution sans Revolution: Scotland & the Panama Papers

By Amy Westwell Tait Masters Student of Literature in Intellectual History  In the early days of the French Revolution, a curious phenomenon occurred. Aristocrats who held provincial privileges, titles, and rights to land, legislated to destroy their own privilege. Later they would explicitly ban insignia adorning houses: coats of arms and weathercocks. Did they partake in this masochistic…

Students for Life: a Controversial Society

Dominic Nolan talks with Jack Stukel, the President of the Students for Life – St Andrews, about running a controversial society in a university environment. What does your society do? Students for Life St Andrews is all about promoting a culture of life in St Andrews University and to celebrate life from conception till natural…

Excellent Essays: The Industrial Revolution as a Result of Britain’s Commercial Success Between 1500-1750

By Sergey Puchkov Economics Undergraduate Student Trade as the Cause of the Industrial Revolution in Britain As Robert C. Allen put it, “Britain’s empire served Britain’s economy.” Between 1500-1750, Britain established a colonial trade empire, and overtook Mediterranean economies in the production and export of wool and draperies. The development of commerce led to: (1) the growth of…

The True Cost of Free University Tuition

By Dominic Nolan Correspondent, Economics and International Relations Undergraduate Student All is not as it appears in Scottish higher education, a system which is held up as a bastion of social progressiveness by many. Scotland is the only nation of the United Kingdom which does not charge its students tuition fees, which some have argued…

Is Foreign Investment in London to Blame for Property Prices?

By James Moynan Theory Section Editor, Economics Undergraduate Student  Siddons Court is a largely unimpressive feat of architecture, a housing block constructed of a mixture of red and brown brick. Its design barely warrants a glance by the common Londoner, especially when compared to the nearby majestic royal opera house. You would assume Flat 1a,…

European Students: How Valuable Will Your Money Be?

By Blanca Franch Camino Correspondent, Undergraduate Economics Student  European Union students at the University of St Andrews have probably been wondering about the most intelligent way to behave regarding recent changes of their finances. Little did they know that many of the most important decisions were being made for them. In fact, during second semester last…

Monetary Policies of the ECB and the Bank of England

By: Renzo Forastiero “The primary objective of the ECB’s monetary policy is to maintain price stability. The ECB aims at inflation rates of below, but close to, 2% over the medium term.” The above sentence highlights the main flaw of the mandate given to the European Central Bank (ECB) at the Euro’s inception, inflexibility.   It’s…

A Study in Supply

By: Leanne Iorio & Natasha Franks One basic law of economics is that low supply + high demand = high prices.  This equation perfectly captures the commercial real estate situation in St Andrews. Commercial property is undoubtedly in low supply in our town, with essentially only three available commercial streets.  Low supply can drive up prices,…